Production 6 Card Deck- Create Your Own Religion

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Create Your Own Religion Card Game Instructions

Teachable Subject: World Religions

Aim: You will be a creator of a new religion. You have many worshippers who are ready to follow you, but are lacking the direction. You are the founder of this new religion, and it is your responsibility to form a set of beliefs, practices and rituals. Your new religion should be different and should not be similar to a predominant world religion. You should have a good understanding of the different aspects of various religions.

How to play: Get into groups of 3-4. Sort the deck by laying out the cards, placing each category in a pile (ex. Afterlife in one pile, Days for Rituals in another pile, etc.) Once your group has sorted the cards, pick an element that your group believes is most important from each category (the categories are labeled around the edges of the card). In the end, your group should end up with 11 cards in total. If you feel like you need more than one card from each category, you have a right to add two cards (total of 13 cards). Now you can think of a name for your religion. This card game allows you to be as creative as you would like. At the end of the deck, your group will have created your own religion. Present your religion to the other groups (vice versa), or to other religion classes (if possible). Players are allowed to move groups to the religion they are interested in following. The group with the most followers gets a prize, and wins the game.

Learning Expectations: This game allows the user to review different views of religions, and what they personally feel is most important to include in a religion. It allows the group members to realize that everyone has their own perspectives and beliefs, and it is important not to criticize or judge anyone because of their beliefs. The groups will learn how to constitute a religion, and even though they are considered members of that religion, they are allowed to convert to other religions (that the other groups have constructed).

After Game Play: Once the game is over, you are responsible for writing a 500-word reflection on which religion you identified yourself as, and the reasons behind your choice. Why did you feel the components of the religion were important? Did you convert to another religion? If so, what component of that religion made you convert? What effect does your religion have on the people who follow it? Explain in 1-2 sentences your reasoning behind each category.

Extras- Let’s Get Creative: Along with your reflection, attach a page of drawn images and symbols associated with your religion. Create a visual of what you imagine your religion to look like. It will be interesting to compare these images with the other members of the religion. Although you may be followers of the same religion, you may visualize it differently in your imaginations. Good luck and be creative!

 

 

(Edited)- Production 2: New Media Literacies- Critical Reflection

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Key Quote: “It is undeniable that students right now require a repertoire of both print and digital literacy practices for their future workplace and life” (Rowsell and Walsh, 54).

This is an interesting quote that summarizes the text of this reading. It claims that the use of technology has transformed almost every institution and career. Educators are expected to apply the use of technology into their students’ learning experiences. Without multi-literacy skills, students lack an online identity, student agency, and cultural participation. Technology is transforming the definition of literate, as it no longer means an individual who is able to read a printed text- but rather an individual who has multi-literacy skills. These skills are required in order to keep up with academic and cultural demands.

print

Majority of jobs require individuals to have digital literacy skills. People now have access to new technological tools, which were not available before. When Web 2.0 technology first emerged, it was mainly used for social networking (a means of communication via Facebook, Skype, etc.) and entertainment (Youtube, online games). It is beneficial in the sense that it provides students with different modes of learning, identity, and student agency. This allows students to be more creative and engaged in their learning. Through situated learning and creative knowledge production, students are thinking, developing, and using their own knowledge.

ebooks

However, through my experiences with working with students with special needs, I believe that the use of technology could be beneficial to students with disabilities as it offers learning opportunities that they are not provided with through printed texts. For example, E-readers can read out the text for those who are illiterate or blind, and turning pages of a text can be done with the tap of a finger. I think that students with disabilities would be more motivated to learn if they had technology that helped meet their individual needs. As written in the text, “a visual, a sound, a word, a movement, animation, spatial dimensions are resources brought together or in isolation to achieve an effect in texts. Such effects are read and composed in different ways compared with linguistic text features” (Rowsell and Walsh, 55). When I recently worked with an autistic child in a classroom, he did not verbally communicate with me, but when I handed him his PECS device, he was able to tell me exactly what he wanted (whether it be to read, a snack, his puzzle, a break, etc.). The device would read aloud the option he selected, and I believe that this is an excellent form of communication for those with disabilities because it gives them some form of language and a voice. In conclusion, new multimodal forms of media provide opportunities and accommodations for all learners, including those with disabilities. It allows students to engage in their learning experience, and provides them with agency.

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(Edited) Production 3: How might you employ a wiki in your content area/s, for your teaching practice, or for your own creative purposes?

Utilizing Wiki in my teaching practice can be beneficial to my students, as it will provide them with knowledge, definitions, origins, sources, and examples of certain terms or concepts. For example, as a religion teacher, I can divide my class into groups and have them research a certain religion (Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, etc.). Using their research sources, they can create a Wiki page for each religion. The headings could be developed collaboratively with the students so that they know what type of information they should be including in their Wiki page. Through this research, students not only gain knowledge and share their knowledge with the public through the Wiki page, but they can also critically reflect upon the knowledge they have acquired to develop their own conclusions. Wiki pages provide students with quality information and sources about a certain concept or term, and also teaches students information literacy skills. When students have information literacy skills, they are able to look at a source and find the important and needed information. This will help me, as a teacher, see where students are struggling with information literacy. 

Production 3: How might you employ a wiki in your content area/s, for your teaching practice, or for your own creative purposes?

Utilizing Wiki in my teaching practice can be beneficial to my students as it will provide them with knowledge, definitions, origins, sources, and examples of certain terms or concepts. For example, as a religion teacher, I can divide my class into groups and have them research a certain religion (Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, etc.). Using their research sources, they can create a Wiki page for each religion. I could also provide them with the headings for the table of contents so that they know what to research and what information to include on the Wiki page. Through this research, students can gain knowledge, and also share their knowledge with the public through the Wiki page. Wiki pages not only provide students with quality information and sources about a certain concept or term, but it also teaches students information literacy skills. When students have information literacy skills, they are able to look at a source and find the important and needed information. This will help me, as a teacher, see where students are struggling with information literacy. 

My Wiki Page- Community of Practice

[[File:COP2.png|300px|thumb|right]]

==Definition==

A ”’community of practice (CoP)”’ is a group of people that form a community through the hobbies and interests that they share with one another. Communities of practice enable its members to interact, share ideas, learn and develop skills from other members of the community. Communities of practice are critical for learning in any community because learning involves participating and experiencing.
Communities of practice are a theory of learning. They are impacting many areas of education across the world, for example:
* CoP’s in the classroom;
* CoP’s to support students;
* virtual CoP’s supporting new and existing teachers;
* CoP’s in informal education;
* CoP’s supporting education specialists;
* CoP’s in higher and adult education;
* CoP’s in e-learning <ref> Retrieved from: https://books.google.ca/books?id=T8tZbGg0-igC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ViewAPI&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false </ref>

==History and Overview==

[[File:COP5.jpg|thumb|90px|left| Jean Lave (Cognitive Anthropologist)]] <ref> http://unt.unice.fr/uoh/learn_teach_FL/img/figures/jean-lave_small.jpg </ref> [[File:COP6.jpg|thumb|90px|right| Etienne Wenger (Educational Theorist)]] <ref> http://wenger-trayner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/12-02-14-ES-formal-picture.jpg </ref>

Although communities of practice have existed for a long time throughout history, it was a concept proposed by Jean Lave (cognitive anthropologist) and Etienne Wenger (educational theorist) in 1991. They defined communities of practice as communities for learning. They used their experiences from apprenticeships to come up with this theory of learning through a process called ”legitimate peripheral participation (LPP)”. This process involves an outsider joining a community not knowing anything- but gradually learning the culture and atmosphere of the community so that they can be considered insiders (or part of the community). Communities of practice were initially used to describe a mode of social learning. <ref> Kimble, C., Hildreth, P.M., & Bourdon, I. ”Communities of Practice: Creating Learning Environments for Educators”, Volume 1. Pp. ix-xix. Retrieved from: https://books.google.ca/books?id=T8tZbGg0-igC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ViewAPI&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false </ref>

==Key Elements==

[[File: COP.jpg|centre]] <ref> http://ged578.pbworks.com/w/page/39335812/Communities%20of%20Practice </ref>

There are three important characteristics that make up a “community of practice.”

====The Domain====

A domain of knowledge creates common ground, inspires members to participate, guides their learning and gives meaning to their actions. Members are brought together by a learning need they share (whether this shared learning need is explicit or not and whether learning is the motivation for their coming together or a by-product of it) <ref>http://wenger-trayner.com/resources/what-is-a-community-of-practice/ </ref> A community of practice is not merely a club of friends or a network of connections between people. It has an identity defined by a shared domain of interest. Membership therefore implies a commitment to the domain, and therefore a shared competence that distinguishes members from other people. (You could belong to the same network as someone and never know it.) The domain is not necessarily something recognized as “expertise” outside the community. A youth gang may have developed all sorts of ways of dealing with their domain: surviving on the street and maintaining some kind of identity they can live with. They value their collective competence and learn from each other, even though few people outside the group may value or even recognize their expertise. <ref> Wenger, E., Wenger, B., (2015) Introduction to Communities of Practice. Retrieved from http://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice/ </ref>

====The Community====

The notion of a community creates the social fabric for that learning. A strong community fosters interactions and encourages a willingness to share ideas. Their collective learning becomes a bond among them over time (experienced in various ways and thus not a source of homogeneity). <ref> http://wenger-trayner.com/resources/what-is-a-community-of-practice/ </ref> In pursuing their interest in their domain, members engage in joint activities and discussions, help each other, and share information. They build relationships that enable them to learn from each other; they care about their standing with each other. A website in itself is not a community of practice. Having the same job or the same title does not make for a community of practice unless members interact and learn together. The claims processors in a large insurance company or students in American high schools may have much in common, yet unless they interact and learn together, they do not form a community of practice. But members of a community of practice do not necessarily work together on a daily basis. The Impressionists, for instance, used to meet in cafes and studios to discuss the style of painting they were inventing together. These interactions were essential to making them a community of practice even though they often painted alone. <ref> Wenger, E., Wenger, B., (2015) Introduction to Communities of Practice. Retrieved from http://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice/ </ref>

====The Practice====

While the domain provides the general area of interest for the community, the practice is the specific focus around which the community develops, shares and maintains its core of knowledge. Their interactions produce resources that affect their practice (whether they engage in the actual practice together or separately). <ref> Etienne Wenger (1998). ”Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity.” Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=heBZpgYUKdAC&dq=Communities+of+Practice:+Learning,+Meaning,+and+Identity&printsec=frontcover&q= </ref> A community of practice is not merely a community of interest–people who like certain kinds of movies, for instance. Members of a community of practice are practitioners. They develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems—in short a shared practice. This takes time and sustained interaction. A good conversation with a stranger on an airplane may give you all sorts of interesting insights, but it does not in itself make for a community of practice. The development of a shared practice may be more or less self-conscious. The “windshield wipers” engineers at an auto manufacturer make a concerted effort to collect and document the tricks and lessons they have learned into a knowledge base. By contrast, nurses who meet regularly for lunch in a hospital cafeteria may not realize that their lunch discussions are one of their main sources of knowledge about how to care for patients. Still, in the course of all these conversations, they have developed a set of stories and cases that have become a shared repertoire for their practice. <ref> Wenger, E., Wenger, B., (2015) Introduction to Communities of Practice. Retrieved from http://wenger-trayner.com/introduction-to-communities-of-practice/ </ref>

==Situated Learning==

[[File:COP4.jpg|thumb|500px|centre]]

Situated learning is learning that takes place in the same context in which it is applied. It is the process of creating meaning from everyday activities, where learning is obtained through social relationships. It could be thought of as a theory on how individuals acquire professional skills, extending research on apprenticeship into how legitimate peripheral participation leads to membership in a community of practice. <ref>Wlliams, H. (1991). Communities of Practice: Creating Learning Environments for Educators. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from url=http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/psychology/developmental-psychology/situated-learning-legitimate-peripheral-participation </ref>

===Motivation===

[[File:COP7.jpg]] [[File:COP8.jpg]] <ref> http://famvin.org/formation-fr/files/2015/05/table.jpg </ref>

Motivation to share knowledge is critical to success in communities of practice. Studies show that members are motivated to become active participants in a CoP when they view knowledge as meant for the public good, a moral obligation and/or as a community interest. Members of a community of practice can also be motivated to participate by using methods such as tangible returns (promotion, raises or bonuses), intangible returns (reputation, self-esteem) and community interest (exchange of practice related knowledge, interaction). <ref> Ardichvilli, Alexander; Page, Vaughn; Wentling, Tim (2003). ”Motivation and barriers to participation in virtual knowledge sharing in communities of practice”. Journal of knowledge management. 7 (1): 64–77. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/13673270310463626 </ref>

You can find a YouTube video on how to build a community of practice by Bill Duane here:
[[How to Build a Community of Practice]]

== See Also ==
* [[Discourse community]]
* [[Knowledge transfer]]
* [[Learning community]]
* [[Legitimate peripheral participation]]
* [[Online community of practice]]
* [[Situated learning]]

==References==
<references />

–[[User:Gasikaistaifan|Gasikaistaifan]] ([[User talk:Gasikaistaifan|talk]])

Production 2: New Media Literacies- Critical Reflection

robothand

Key Quote: “It is undeniable that students right now require a repertoire of both print and digital literacy practices for their future workplace and life” (Rowsell and Walsh, 54).

This is an interesting quote that summarizes the entire text of this reading. It claims that the use of technology has transformed almost every institution and career. Educators are expected to apply the use of technology into their students’ learning experiences. Without multi-literacy skills, students are less likely to find a job in comparison to students with those skills. Technology is transforming the definition of literate, as it no longer means an individual who is able to read a printed text- but rather an individual who has multi-literacy skills. These skills are required in order to keep up with academic and cultural demands.

print

Majority of jobs require individuals to have digital literacy skills. When technology first emerged, it was used mainly for social networking (a means of communication via Facebook, Skype, etc.) and entertainment (Youtube, online games). Incorporating technology into student’s learning experiences could be both beneficial and harmful. It is beneficial in the sense that it provides students with different modes of learning, allowing them access to all types of resources within the click of a button. It is harmful due to the fact that students are no longer critically thinking because they are not using their own knowledge, but are rather relying on the Internet to answer most of their questions. With the use of technology, students no longer need to worry about knowing how to spell because they depend on autocorrect to fix all spelling mistakes for them. This could possibly affect the student’s memory and the strength of their brain. I think that if schools are going to incorporate the use of technology in their teachings, they should do it in a way that does not replace a student’s knowledge.ebooks.jpg

However, through my experiences with working with students with special needs, I believe that the use of technology could be very beneficial to students with disabilities as it offers learning opportunities that they are not provided with through digital texts. For example, E-readers can read out the text for those who are illiterate or blind, and turning pages of a text can be done with the tap of a finger. I think that students with disabilities would be more motivated to learn if they had technology that helped meet their individual needs. As written in the text, “a visual, a sound, a word, a movement, animation, spatial dimensions are resources brought together or in isolation to achieve an effect in texts. Such effects are read and composed in different ways compared with linguistic text features” (Rowsell and Walsh, 55). When I recently worked with an autistic child in a classroom, he did not verbally communicate with me, but when I handed him his PECS device, he was able to tell me exactly what he wanted (whether it be to read, a snack, his puzzle, a break, etc.). The device would read aloud the option he selected, and I believe that this is an excellent form of communication for those with disabilities because it gives them some form of language and a voice.

t15-angle